dogs, Mixed breed, Nose work, Scent work, Uncategorized

High in Trial – Truman Blue Scores!

Soggy dogs. It rained and rained, but the participants in the scent work trials were used to working in natural elements. Canines and people were wet and muddy, but that didn’t matter at this show. It was the ability of the dogs to locate a hidden odor cannister that counted.

Scent work is a dog sport where the handler learns more than the dog. The dog already knows how to find things with its nose. They are born that way. It is the handler who must explain to the dog which scent he should find, and then allow the dog to do its thing. It is an amazing privilege to understand how a dog reads the world with its nose.

This was Truman Blue’s first AKC Scent Work Trial. At this one show, there were two trials with identical classes. We entered four classes in each trial, so a total of eight classes.

  • Containers (the scent hidden in one out of 10 boxes)
  • Interior (the scent hidden in a room in a barn)
  • Exterior (the scent hidden in a roped off area outside)
  • Buried (the scent hidden in one of 10 boxes filled with sand)

Truman earned four first place ribbons, three second place ribbons, and bombed one class…more later on that one bomb, and the handler’s role in reading the dog. His desire to please and ferret out scents earned him High in Trial at his very first dog show

Cozy mystery, dogs, elderly and dogs, Labrador Retriever, Margie Vonn, Mixed breed, Nose work, Therapy Dog, Truman Blue Mysteries

Celebrating a New Book Release – Naturally

Celebrating can be disastrous. There’s the prep, the expense, and the stress of performance. Since it was sunny and 62 degrees, Truman and I went on a walk about on our few acres. I didn’t even put on a bra, and Truman didn’t even put on a harness. We celebrated the day, just as it was.

Truman ran, following what delighted his nose. When we walk, he keeps an eye on me most of the time. Occasionally his quarter-bloodhound DNA has him so engrossed in following his nose, I tease him by hiding. A few seconds later, when his one-third-Labrador DNA reminds him of his need to be with his mom, he starts casting his nose for my scent. It never takes more than a couple of seconds before he catches the scent of my trail and heads toward my hiding place. His less than 10% middle-eastern-hound DNA kicks into high speed, and he finds me.

Truman romped while I surveyed my micro-kingdom. Truman followed his nose and I followed my eyes, evaluating the state of living off the land. Waiting for the chance to spice up a salad, mint surrounds my still green blueberries and figs. I snapped off a few green daylily buds and snacked on them. I love eating off the bush. We stopped by one of the beehives, the girls were just waking up and sunned themselves on the deck before they took flight. The pear trees planted in January were too you ng to bloom this year, but might produce some Bartletts next year.

Nature provides something to look forward to, and the celebration was peaceful and easy. (books are free on Kindle Unlimited and don’t cost much on Kindle)

A multicolored hound dog sniffing a dark object in a jar.
Cozy mystery, dogs, Mixed breed, Nose work, Therapy Dog, Truman Blue Mysteries

Following a New Scent

Truman and I have approximately the same level of engagement curiosity. That means we like to do things together that are fun, but don’t drain too much energy and are not too risky.

So what does that mean for a dog who is a quarter bloodhound and a third Labrador? You guessed it, nose work. Using instincts, Truman can find his tug toy in a three acre pasture. He doesn’t need to be trained to use his nose, because he sees with it. The problem in doing structured nose work activities, is that we need to learn learn to read each signals so we can work together as a team.

Once again, my relationship with my dog reminds me of my marriage. I appreciate my dog’s skills and abilities (my husband’s too). In order to accomplish a task with the ultimate sum being more than the parts, we need to communicate compassionately and clearly, taking into consideration and using our different perspectives of the world.